Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and publicly accessible defibrillator use in the UK

Hawkes, Claire A., Kander, Inès, Contreras, Abraham , Ji, Chen, Brown, Terry P., Booth, Scott, Siriwardena, A. Niroshan, Fothergill, Rachael J., Williams, Julie, Rees, Nigel, Stephenson, Estelle and Perkins, Gavin D. (2022) Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and publicly accessible defibrillator use in the UK. Resuscitation Plus, 10 . p. 100256. ISSN 2666 -5204

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resplu.2022.100256

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Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and publicly accessible defibrillator use in the UK
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Abstract

Introduction
Members of the public can initiate resuscitation, contributing to improved survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Many countries have seen increasing proportions of their populations trained in resuscitation skills and reporting that they would be likely to use them if needed. This study investigated changes in the UK public’s attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and publicly accessible defibrillator (PAD) use during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods
An observational study comparing pre-pandemic (2019) and survey data collected at 5 time points during the pandemic between April and November 2020. YouGov administered the surveys achieving samples of over 4000 each time. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse responses. Logistic regression and post-hoc contrasts of marginal linear predictions were used to explore trend changes.

Results
Compared with pre-pandemic responses, during the pandemic participants reported being more likely to perform CPR in spite of increased concerns about catching a disease. Proportions reporting that they were likely to perform compression-only CPR rose (58.0% to 67.8%) while CPR with rescue breaths declined (58.1% to 39.4%)(both linear trends p<0.001). Awareness of safe CPR pandemic guidance was low (31.7%). Lack of knowledge remained one of the main reasons that made people reluctant to perform CPR (42.9%).

Conclusions
Encouragingly, people’s willingness to help someone sustaining an OHCA has not declined during the pandemic in the UK. Continued efforts to inform the public of safe practice when performing CPR are needed.

Keywords:out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, resuscitation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, public access defibrillator, education campaigns, COVID-19
Subjects:A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:49665
Deposited On:07 Jun 2022 13:37

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