To replicate or conceal? Creating fairer lineups for multiple suspects with dissimilar distinctive features

Harris, Georgia and Onwuegbusi, Tochukwu (2022) To replicate or conceal? Creating fairer lineups for multiple suspects with dissimilar distinctive features. In: Division of Forensic Psychology Conference, 14-16th June 2022, voco St. John's, Solihull.

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To replicate or conceal? Creating fairer lineups for multiple suspects with dissimilar distinctive features
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Abstract

Objectives: Current UK police lineup guidance is ambiguous, allowing officer discretion which can lead to differing practices. While most crime is committed in the company of others, little research has explored implications of lineup presentation, distinctive feature methods and perpetrator size. Such variables were combined to better understand superior lineup presentation methods, with aims to inform police procedure.
Design: A 2 (lineup type: replication, concealment) x 2 (lineup presentation: simultaneous, sequential) x 2 (perpetrator size: 1, 2) mixed-factorial design was used. Confidence judgements were collected before and after each lineup. Hits and false alarm (FA) rates were computed. The Calibration (C), Over/Underconfidence (OU), and Adjusted Normalised Resolution Index (ANRI) statistics were computed to examine confidence-accuracy relationship.
Methods: 161 participants took part in an online study, involving 24 trials (36 lineups) yet the order was randomised, and conditions counterbalanced.
Results: Hit rates was higher in simultaneous than sequential lineup when the features were concealed and decreased as perpetrator size increased from 1 to 2 faces. Replication produced more FA in target-absent lineups than concealment. FA rates was also higher in sequential than simultaneous lineup. Post-lineup confidence judgements were more indicative of accuracy.
Conclusions: Findings suggest that crimes involving two perpetrators produced fewer hits and more false alarms than did one perpetrator crime. Simultaneous lineup increased target identification than sequential, suggesting participants were less able to apply an absolute decision strategy. However, replicating or concealing a distinctive feature is not predictive of identification performance in target present lineups. Implications for eyewitness facial identification is discussed.

Keywords:Police lineups, forensic, face recognition, eyewitness, multiple perpetrators, distinctive features, suspects
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C810 Applied Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:49611
Deposited On:17 Jun 2022 10:48

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