Migrant GPs and patients: a cross-sectional study of practice characteristics, patient experiences and migration concordance

Groenewegen, Peter P., Spreeuwenberg, Peter, Siriwardena, Niro , Sirdifield, Coral and Willems, Sara (2022) Migrant GPs and patients: a cross-sectional study of practice characteristics, patient experiences and migration concordance. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care . ISSN 0281-3432

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/02813432.2022.2069719

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Migrant GPs and patients: a cross-sectional study of practice characteristics, patient experiences and migration concordance
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Abstract

Objective: To investigate practice type and location of native and immigrant general practitioners (GPs); effects of migration status concordance between GPs and patients on experiences of patients in key areas of primary care quality and discrimination. Design and setting: Secondary analysis of GP and patient survey data from QUALICOPC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care), a cross-sectional study of GPs and their patients in 34 countries, performed between 2011 and 2013. Main outcome measures: We explored practice type and location of native and immigrant GPs and the experiences of native patients and patients with a migration background of communication, continuity, comprehensiveness, accessibility, and discrimination, using multilevel analysis. Concordance was modelled as a cross-level interaction between migration status of GPs and patients. Results: Percentages of immigrant GPs varied widely. In Europe, this was highest in England and Luxemburg (40% of GPs born abroad) and lowest in Bulgaria and Romania (1%). The practice population of immigrant GPs more often included an above average proportion of people from ethnic minorities. There were no differences in main effects of patient experiences following a visit to an immigrant or native GP, in four core areas of primary care or in discrimination. However, people from first-generation migrant background more often experienced discrimination, in particular when visiting a native GP. Conclusion: Patient experiences did not vary with GPs’ migration status. Although experience of discrimination was uncommon, first-generation migrant patients experienced more discrimination. Primary care should provide non-discriminatory care, through GP awareness of unconscious bias and training to address this.

Keywords:Concordance, discrimination, health service research, family practice, patient experiences, immigrant GPs, migrant patients
Subjects:A Medicine and Dentistry > A900 Others in Medicine and Dentistry
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:49312
Deposited On:16 May 2022 14:41

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