Ethnicity and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the healthcare workforce: Results of a retrospective cohort study in rural United Kingdom.

Inghels, Maxime, Kane, Ros, Lall, Priya , Nelson, David, Nanyonjo, Agnes, Asghar, Zahid, Ward, Derek, McCranor, Tracy, Kavanagh, Tony, Hogue, Todd, Phull, Jaspreet and Tanser, Frank (2022) Ethnicity and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the healthcare workforce: Results of a retrospective cohort study in rural United Kingdom. International Journal of Infectious Diseases . ISSN 1201-9712

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2022.05.013

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Ethnicity and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the healthcare workforce: Results of a retrospective cohort study in rural United Kingdom
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Abstract

Background
The reason why Black and South Asian healthcare workers are at a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection remain unclear. We aim to quantify risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection among ethnic minority healthcare staff and elucidate pathways of infection.

Methods
A one-year-follow-up retrospective cohort study has been conducted among NHS employees working at 123 facilities in Lincolnshire, UK.

Results
Overall, 13,366 professionals were included. SARS-CoV-2 incidence per person-year was 5.2% [95%CI: 3.6%–7.6%] during the first COVID-19 wave (Jan-Aug 2020) and 17.2% [13.5%–22.0%] during the second wave (Sep 2020-Feb 2021). Compared to White staff, Black and South Asian employees were at higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection during both the first wave (HR, 1.58 [0.91-2.75] and 1.69 [1.07-2.66] respectively) and the second wave (HR 2.09 [1.57-2.76] and 1.46 [1.24-1.71]). Higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection persisted even after controlling for age, gender, pay grade, residence environment, type of work and time exposure at work. Higher adjusted risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection were also found among lower-paid health professionals.

Conclusions
Black and South Asian health workers continue to be more at risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to their White counterparts. Urgent interventions are required to reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection in these ethnic groups.

Keywords:SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, risk factors, Ethnicity, Health professionals, United Kingdom
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
A Medicine and Dentistry > A900 Others in Medicine and Dentistry
A Medicine and Dentistry > A990 Medicine and Dentistry not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health
College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:49282
Deposited On:16 May 2022 15:06

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