Warm-Up Intensity Does Not Affect the Ergogenic Effect of Sodium Bicarbonate in Adult Men

Jones, Rebecca L., Stellingwerff, Trent, Swinton, Paul , Artioli, Guilherme Giannini, Saunders, Bryan and Sale, Craig (2021) Warm-Up Intensity Does Not Affect the Ergogenic Effect of Sodium Bicarbonate in Adult Men. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 31 (6). pp. 482-489. ISSN 1526-484X

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2021-0076

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Warm-Up Intensity Does Not Affect the Ergogenic Effect of Sodium Bicarbonate in Adult Men
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Abstract

This study determined the influence of a high- (HI) versus low-intensity (LI) cycling warm-up on blood acid-base responses and exercise capacity following ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (SB; 0.3 g/kg body mass) or a placebo (PLA; maltodextrin) 3 hr prior to warm-up. Twelve men (21 ± 2 years, 79.2 ± 3.6 kg body mass, and maximum power output [Wmax] 318 ± 36 W) completed a familiarization and four double-blind trials in a counterbalanced order: HI warm-up with SB, HI warm-up with PLA, LI warm-up with SB, and LI warm-up with PLA. LI warm-up was 15 min at 60% Wmax, while the HI warm-up (typical of elites) featured LI followed by 2 × 30 s (3-min break) at Wmax, finishing 30 min prior to a cycling capacity test at 110% Wmax. Blood bicarbonate and lactate were measured throughout. SB supplementation increased blood bicarbonate (+6.4 mmol/L; 95% confidence interval, CI [5.7, 7.1]) prior to greater reductions with HI warm-up (−3.8 mmol/L; 95% CI [−5.8, −1.8]). However, during the 30-min recovery, blood bicarbonate rebounded and increased in all conditions, with concentrations ∼5.3 mmol/L greater with SB supplementation (p < .001). Blood bicarbonate significantly declined during the cycling capacity test at 110%Wmax with greater reductions following SB supplementation (−2.4 mmol/L; 95% CI [−3.8, −0.90]). Aligned with these results, SB supplementation increased total work done during the cycling capacity test at 110% Wmax (+8.5 kJ; 95% CI [3.6, 13.4], ∼19% increase) with no significant main effect of warm-up intensity (+0.0 kJ; 95% CI [−5.0, 5.0]). Collectively, the results demonstrate that SB supplementation can improve HI cycling capacity irrespective of prior warm-up intensity, likely due to blood alkalosis.

Keywords:buffering, high intensity, low intensity, supplementation
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:49273
Deposited On:08 Jun 2022 11:02

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