Progressive constitutional deliberation: Political equality, social inequalities and democracy’s legitimacy challenge

Trantidis, Aris (2023) Progressive constitutional deliberation: Political equality, social inequalities and democracy’s legitimacy challenge. Politics . ISSN 0263-3957

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1177/02633957221074899

Documents
Progressive constitutional deliberation: Political equality, social inequalities and democracy’s legitimacy challenge
Author's accepted manuscript
[img]
[Download]
[img] Microsoft Word
Replacement Final Version.docx - Whole Document
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International.

107kB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Social inequalities fuel a debate about the meaning of political equality. Formal procedural equality is criticised for reproducing discriminatory outcomes against disadvantaged groups but affirmative action, particularly in the form of group quotas, is also contested. When opposing conceptions of substantive equality support divergent views about which procedural rule genuinely respects political equality, democracies cannot identify a standard or rule of procedural fairness to be widely accepted as fair. This dispute over procedural fairness can carry on indefinitely and could challenge democracy’s legitimacy claim. I argue that democracies can renew their legitimacy claim by embracing this debate and by accommodating it through constitutional deliberation that must be as impartial and meaningful as possible. Impartiality ideally requires the presence of every citizen in this process because each of them has a unique and evolving experience of inequality. Meaningful deliberation is about offering periodic opportunities for constitutional reform, allowing for continuous feedback, reflection, and learning.

Keywords:Affirmative action, constitutional reform, deliberative democracy, democratic legitimacy, inequalities, political equality, substantive equality
Subjects:L Social studies > L222 Democracy
L Social studies > L200 Politics
L Social studies > L210 Political Theories
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Social & Political Sciences
ID Code:49241
Deposited On:16 May 2022 13:28

Repository Staff Only: item control page