Our connected future with the turn-key technologies that are reducing food waste and improving nutrition

Martindale, Wayne (2021) Our connected future with the turn-key technologies that are reducing food waste and improving nutrition. New Zealand Science Review, 77 (3-4). pp. 52-54. ISSN 0028-8667

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Our connected future with the turn-key technologies that are reducing food waste and improving nutrition
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Abstract

A generation has passed since the publication of Our Common
Future, known as the Brundtland Report, which set out a requirement for sustainable development indicators so that policy
makers could quantify the total value of all natural resources
(Brundtland, 1987). This began a process of providing the global
food system with a set of values that would provide baseline
information or starting points for which future indicators and
assessments of sustainable development could be made. It has
provided sustainability route maps and recognised that new
data tools were needed to implement solutions for sustainable
development. The food systems role in achieving this was of
importance because of the data held in supply chains concerned
with the energy and materials used to manufacture and distribute
food. An example of such a primary impact indicator is the use
of nitrogen fertilisers that support high-yielding agriculture;
their role in the food system is critical, with over a fifth of the
nitrogen in all global protein being derived from industrially
manufactured nitrogenous fertiliser (Smil, 2002). There are
important outcomes for the use of energy and materials, such
as the release of nitrous oxide greenhouse gases from organic
and mineral nitrogen fertiliser use, that are identified as causal
agents in environmental change. Characterising these materials
and their associated processes has brought forward new methods
of assessing nutrient flow, and the use of digital technologies
has enabled improved traceability of information regarding
their use. This has enabled the use of common frameworks and
vocabularies to describe sustainable practices, which helps to
provide incisive models, scenario generation and digital twins
for food system activities.

Keywords:Digital Twins, Food Waste
Subjects:D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D610 Food Science
D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D640 Food and Beverages for the Consumer
Divisions:College of Science > National Centre for Food Manufacturing
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ID Code:47945
Deposited On:09 Feb 2022 12:06

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