The relationship between vection, cybersickness and head movements elicited by illusory motion in virtual reality

Pöhlmann, Katharina Margareta Theresa, Foecker, Julia, Dickinson, Patrick , Parke, Adrian and O'Hare, Louise (2022) The relationship between vection, cybersickness and head movements elicited by illusory motion in virtual reality. Displays, 71 . ISSN 0141-9382

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.displa.2021.102111

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The relationship between vection, cybersickness and head movements elicited by illusory motion in virtual reality
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Abstract

Cybersickness is an unpleasant side effect of Virtual Reality and is often detrimental to a user’s experience. It
shows a complex relationship to vection (illusory self-motion) as well as postural instability. Three experiments
were conducted presenting both expanding and rotating colourful optimised Fraser Wilcox illusions as well as
grey-scaled controlled versions of the illusions. Cybersickness and vection were reported and head movements in
medio-lateral and anterior-posterior direction were recorded. The experiments found that perceived visual
motion (illusory motion) is sufficient to elicit vection in the absence of any stimulated visual motion. The
strength of motion perceived in the illusions was related to the experience of cybersickness and vection, with
illusions that were perceived as moving more eliciting stronger experiences of both. Surprisingly, rotating illusions were continuously perceived as moving more compared to expanding motion illusions, which could be
related to missing stereoscopic motion-in-depth cues. Head movements were unrelated to any stimuli properties,
suggesting that the motion signal elicited by the illusions might not have been strong enough to cause postural
instability. Finally, dizziness has been identified as the possible link between cybersickness, vection and head
movements supporting sensory conflict as well postural instability theories of cybersickness.

Keywords:Perception, Virtual Reality, Vection, Discomfort, Motion illusion, cybersickness
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
G Mathematical and Computer Sciences > G400 Computer Science
C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C830 Experimental Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:47492
Deposited On:10 Jan 2022 15:14

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