Assessing the impact of heat treatment of food on antimicrobial resistance genes and their potential uptake by other bacteria - A critical review

James, Christian, Dixon, Ron, Talbot, Luke , James, Stephen, Williams, Nicola, Onarinde, Bukola, , and , (2021) Assessing the impact of heat treatment of food on antimicrobial resistance genes and their potential uptake by other bacteria - A critical review. Antibiotics, 10 (12). p. 1440. ISSN 2079-6382

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10121440

Documents
Assessing the impact of heat treatment of food on antimicrobial resistance genes and their potential uptake by other bacteria - A critical review
Authors' Accepted Manuscript

Request a copy
Assessing the impact of heat treatment of food on antimicrobial resistance genes and their potential uptake by other bacteria - A critical review
Published Open Access manuscript
[img]
[Download]
[img] Microsoft Word
Manuscript Draft.docx - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.

1MB
[img]
Preview
PDF
antibiotics-10-01440-v2.pdf - Whole Document
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.

650kB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

The dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is a global health concern. This study identifies and critically reviews the published evidence on whether cooking (heating) food to eliminate bacterial contamination induces sufficient damage to the functionality of ARGs. Overall, the review found that there is evidence in the literature that Antimicrobial Resistant (AMR) bacteria are no more heat resistant than non-AMR bacteria. Consequently, recommended heat treatments sufficient to kill non-AMR bacteria in food (70 °C for at least 2 min, or equivalent) should be equally effective in killing AMR bacteria. The literature shows there are several mechanisms through which functional genes from AMR bacteria could theoretically persist in heat-treated food and be trans-ferred to other bacteria. The literature search found sparce published evidence on whether ARGs may actually persist in food after effective heat treatments, and whether functional genes can be transferred to other bacteria. However, three publications have demonstrated that functional ARGs in plasmids may be capable of persisting in foods after effective heat treatments. Given the global impact of AMR, there is clearly a need for further practical research on this topic to provide suffi-cient evidence to fully assess whether there is a risk to human health from the persistence of func-tional ARGs in heat-treated and cooked foods.

Keywords:antimicrobial resistance, antimicrobial resistance gene, bacteriophage, food, gene transfer, heat treatment, membrane vesicles, plasmid
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C440 Molecular Genetics
C Biological Sciences > C521 Medical Microbiology
C Biological Sciences > C500 Microbiology
Divisions:College of Science > National Centre for Food Manufacturing
ID Code:47388
Deposited On:23 Nov 2021 15:20

Repository Staff Only: item control page