Locus of control as a moderator of the effects of COVID-19 perceptions on job insecurity, psychosocial, organisational and job outcomes for MENA region hospitality employees

Mahmoud, Ali B., Reisel, William D., Fuxman, Leonora and Hack-polay, Dieu (2022) Locus of control as a moderator of the effects of COVID-19 perceptions on job insecurity, psychosocial, organisational and job outcomes for MENA region hospitality employees. European Management Review . ISSN 1740-4762

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/emre.12494

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Locus of control as a moderator of the effects of COVID-19 perceptions on job insecurity, psychosocial, organisational and job outcomes for MENA region hospitality employees
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Abstract

We develop and test an integrated model to understand how individual differences based on internal or external locus of control can influence the effects of COVID-19 perceptions on job insecurity, anxiety, alienation, job satisfaction, customer orientation, organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB), and turnover intention among customer service employees working in hospitality organisations in the Middle East and North African (MENA) region. The investigation utilises variance-based Structural Equation Modelling to evaluate a sample of 847 subject responses. We found that externally controlled employees are more likely to develop negative emotions as a result of pandemic-triggered job insecurity as well as poorer customer orientation and engagement in OCB due to worsened job satisfaction than those internally controlled. Wholistically, COVID-19 perceptions tend to indirectly hit externally controlled employees’ anxiety, customer orientation and OCB more intensely than those with internal locus of control.

Keywords:Locus of control, Covid-19, Job insecurity, Psychosocial factors, Organisational citizenship behaviour
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N600 Human Resource Management
L Social studies > L300 Sociology
N Business and Administrative studies > N200 Management studies
Divisions:Lincoln International Business School
ID Code:47327
Deposited On:19 Nov 2021 10:59

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