Incorporating subject-specific geometry to compare metatarsal stress during running with different foot strike patterns

Ellison, M.A, Kenny, M., Fulford, J. , Javadi, A. and Rice, H.M. (2020) Incorporating subject-specific geometry to compare metatarsal stress during running with different foot strike patterns. Journal of Biomechanics, 105 . p. 109792. ISSN 0021-9290

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2020.109792

Documents
Incorporating subject-specific geometry to compare metatarsal stress during running with different foot strike patterns
Published Open Access manuscript
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
1-s2.0-S0021929020302128-main.pdf - Whole Document
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.

1MB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Stress fracture of the second metatarsal is a common and problematic injury for runners. The choice of foot strike pattern is known to affect external kinetics and kinematics but its effect on internal loading of the metatarsals is not well understood. Subject-specific models of the second metatarsal can be used to investigate internal loading in a non-invasive manner. This study aimed to compare second metatarsal stress between habitual rearfoot and non-rearfoot strikers during barefoot running, using a novel subject specific mathematical model, including accurate metatarsal geometry. Synchronised force and kinematic data were collected during barefoot overground running from 20 participants (12 rearfoot strikers). Stresses were calculated at the plantar and dorsal periphery of the midshaft of the metatarsal using a subject-specific beam theory model. Non-rearfoot strikers demonstrated greater external loading, bending moments and compressive forces than rearfoot strikers, but there were no differences in peak stresses between groups. Statistical parametric analysis revealed that non-rearfoot strikers had greater second metatarsal stresses during early stance but that there was no difference in peak stresses. This emphasises the importance of bone geometry when estimating bone stress and supports the suggestion that external forces should not be assumed to be representative of internal loading.

Keywords:stress fracture, finite element modelling, metatarsals
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
Divisions:Professional services
ID Code:47271
Deposited On:17 Nov 2021 16:21

Repository Staff Only: item control page