Crossing the Red Line? Empirical Evidence and Useful Recommendations on Questionable Research Practices among Business Scholars

Jabbour, Charbel Jose Chiappetta and Lopes de Sousa Jabbour, Beatriz (2021) Crossing the Red Line? Empirical Evidence and Useful Recommendations on Questionable Research Practices among Business Scholars. Journal of Business Ethics . ISSN 0167-4544

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-021-04961-7

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Crossing the Red Line? Empirical Evidence and Useful Recommendations on Questionable Research Practices among Business Scholars
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Abstract

Academic leaders in management from all over the world—including recent calls by the Academy of Management Shaw (Academy of Management Journal 60(3): 819–822, 2017)—have urged further research into the extent and use of questionable research practices (QRPs). In order to provide empirical evidence on the topic of QRPs, this work presents two linked studies. Study 1 determines the level of use of QRPs based on self-admission rates and estimated prevalence among business scholars in Indonesia. It was determined that if the level of QRP use identified in Study 1 was quite high, Study 2 would be conducted to follow-up on this result, and this was indeed the case. Study 2 examines the factors that encourage and discourage the use of QRPs in the sample analyzed. The main research findings are as follows: (a) in Study 1, we found the self-admission rates and estimated prevalence of business scholars’ involvement in QRPs to be quite high when compared with studies conducted in other countries and (b) in Study 2, we found pressure for publication from universities, fear of rejection of manuscripts, meeting the expectations of reviewers, and available rewards to be the main reasons for the use of QRPs in Indonesia, whereas (c) formal sanctions and prevention efforts are factors that discourage QRPs. Recommendations for stakeholders (in this case, reviewers, editors, funders, supervisors, chancellors and others) are also provided in order to reduce the use of QRPs.

Additional Information:Published in Open Access - Gold
Keywords:research ethics, management research, Business research methods
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N100 Business studies
Divisions:Lincoln International Business School
ID Code:47194
Deposited On:09 Nov 2021 14:45

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