Rethinking the health implications of society-environment relationships in built areas: an assessment of the Access to Healthy and Hazards Index in the context of COVID-19.

Moore, Harriet, Hill, Bartholomew, Siriwardena, Niro , Tanser, Frank and Spaight, Robert (2021) Rethinking the health implications of society-environment relationships in built areas: an assessment of the Access to Healthy and Hazards Index in the context of COVID-19. Landscapes and Urban Planning, 217 . p. 104265. ISSN 0169-2046

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2021.104265

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Rethinking the health implications of society-environment relationships in built areas: an assessment of the Access to Healthy and Hazards Index in the context of COVID-19
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Abstract

Urban environments have been evolving to mitigate threats to the health and wellbeing of societies for thousands of years, including establishing open spaces to combat bubonic plague, improving waste management in the 20th century, and more recently retrofitting urban landscapes with green space to promote physical exercise. In the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic there is a need to rethink how societies interact with space in built environments to prevent contagion at the same time as facilitating health behaviours, such as exercise. Previously, we examined the spatial relationship between features of urban landscapes that are commonly considered to be ‘hazardous’ and ‘healthy’ and unusual clusters of COVID-19 cases in the East Midlands of the UK using ambulance data. Here, we consider the nature of social engagement that these features of urban landscapes facilitate and identify society-environment interactions that may increase risk of exposure to the virus. In some cases, spaces that are commonly thought to promote health behaviour may increase exposure. Contagion hot-spots occur at the nexus of exposure and underlying susceptibility. The viral-host dynamics of infectious disease are changing. Now, as in past eras, societies are required to evolve and adapt to the new challenges presented by emerging infectious diseases in the modern world.

Keywords:COVID-19, urban landscapes, contagion hot-spots, AHAHI, society-environment relationships
Subjects:K Architecture, Building and Planning > K320 Landscape studies
L Social studies > L510 Health & Welfare
Divisions:College of Science > School of Geography
ID Code:46930
Deposited On:18 Oct 2021 08:55

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