Lecture start time and sleep characteristics: Analysis of daily diaries of undergraduate students from the LoST-Sleep project

Swinnerton, Lucy, Moldovan, Andreea A., Mann, Carly M. , Durrant, Simon J. and Mireku, Michael O. (2021) Lecture start time and sleep characteristics: Analysis of daily diaries of undergraduate students from the LoST-Sleep project. Sleep Health, 7 (5). pp. 565-571. ISSN 2352-7218

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2021.04.001

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Lecture start time and sleep characteristics: Analysis of daily diaries of undergraduate students from the LoST-Sleep project
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Abstract

Objectives
Emerging evidence shows that later high school start times are associated with increased sleep duration; however, little is known if this extends to the university setting. This study investigated associations of first lecture start times with sleep characteristics among university students.
Design
Daily diaries.
Setting
Lincoln, UK.
Participants
One hundred and fifty-five undergraduate students completed 7-night sleep diaries MEASUREMENTS: Of the plausible lecture-day diaries (Monday-to-Friday, expected N = 755 days), 567 days were lecture days (M = 3.8 lecture-days per student, SD = 1.1). The Consensus Sleep Diary was used to collect sleep characteristics. Two-level multilevel mixed effect generalized linear models were employed in the analyses.
Results
Seventy-five percent of first lectures occurred before noon. Students reported short sleep (M = 7.0 hours, SD = 1.9) and fewer reported highest levels of sleep quality (42.8%) and restfulness (24.8%) when first lectures started at 09:00 or 09:30 compared to 10:00 or later. Every hour delay of first lecture start time was associated with 15.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.5; 20.7) minutes increase in sleep duration and higher odds of reporting the highest levels of sleep quality and restfulness. Focusing on attended lectures starting before noon, hourly delay of first lecture start time was associated with 37.4 (95% CI: 22.0; 52.8) minutes increased sleep duration. Bedtime, sleep time, and sleep onset latency were not significantly associated with first lecture start times.
Conclusion
This study found that undergraduate students had longer sleep and healthier sleep quality when university first lectures started later. The earliest lecture start time that afforded sufficient sleep duration for students was 10:00.

Keywords:Sleep, school time
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C810 Applied Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C812 Educational Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:46418
Deposited On:10 Sep 2021 14:01

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