Expertise, Born of Experience: An autoethnographic exploration of my development as a pioneering expert by experience in maternity service provision and my subsequent influence on the education of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom

Hunt, Sophia Elizabeth (2021) Expertise, Born of Experience: An autoethnographic exploration of my development as a pioneering expert by experience in maternity service provision and my subsequent influence on the education of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom. PhD thesis, University of Lincoln.

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Expertise, Born of Experience: An autoethnographic exploration of my development as a pioneering expert by experience in maternity service provision and my subsequent influence on the education of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom
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Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
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Abstract

This thesis presents a portfolio of evidence of my work as an Expert by Experience (EbE) in health and social care. Using the Critical Practice Framework (Barnett, 1997) as structure, I have written an overarching narrative of the thesis to bind together my portfolio of evidence with my individual journey, and a critical examination of theory and literature, to demonstrate the original contribution I have made to education and training of midwives in the UK.

In addition to the portfolio of practice-based evidence presented, the research strategy of autoethnography was selected as an appropriate means to narrate the thesis, as it provides a reflexive, qualitative methodology in which I, as the researcher, am also the primary subject-participant. The thesis draws on both analytic and evocative forms of autoethnography. Using evocative autoethnography, I share my personal story of recurrent miscarriage and still-birth, where the data are comprised of my deepest thoughts, memories, letters and diaries. In a more traditional academic ‘voice’, I employ analytic autoethnography to analyse and situate my own actions, and critically to reflect on my role as an EbE. This analytic perspective acknowledges the conscious and (as far as possible) subconscious ways I have sought to gain credibility and acceptance within the highly professionalised world of healthcare education and policy. Uncomfortably, this includes the personal sacrifices and ethical dilemmas I have faced and worked through in order to establish my expertise, reputation and status.

To situate the thesis and portfolio, I critically discuss how pervasive power hierarchies within healthcare policy and practice continue to reduce many well-intentioned Patient and Public Involvement initiatives, badged as ‘co-production’, to consumerist-style consultation exercises, where the full potential contribution and value of experts by experience is rarely realised. I also reflect upon the fact that my own ability to make personal sacrifices, in order to make my voice heard, may have inadvertently made it more difficult for others to do the same. I conclude with a series of recommendations for my own future work, and for empowering and extending the contribution of others in ways that are meaningful for them within the important area of lay influence, healthcare policy and practice

Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:46299
Deposited On:01 Sep 2021 09:06

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