The Politics of Nuclear Energy in the European Union. Framing the Discourse: Actors, Positions and Dynamics

Barnes, Pamela M. (2021) The Politics of Nuclear Energy in the European Union. Framing the Discourse: Actors, Positions and Dynamics. PhD thesis, University of Lincoln.

Documents
The Politics of Nuclear Energy in the European Union. Framing the Discourse: Actors, Positions and Dynamics
Thesis
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
Pamela Mary Barnes - PhD - Politics.pdf - Whole Document

758kB
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

The submission presents a body of work analyzing the impact of changes to the political environment in which the European Union (EU)’s nuclear energy policy operated during a period of dramatic change for the EU from the late 1990s to the late 2010s. In the late 1990s/early 2000s the process of enlargement taking the EU from 15 to 28 Member States by 2013 began, and brought with it significant energy policy challenges for all the states involved. As the 2000s advanced, hegemonization of climate change in the energy discourse further challenged the EU’s policy makers searching for EU policy for sustainable, secure and competitive energy. Both events brought changes to the context in which the EU’s nuclear energy policy operates and were formative moments in the policy process.

The publications were underpinned by three broad based and inter-linked themes, the:
- ‘stickiness” of the Euratom Treaty that provides the legal framework for EU nuclear energy policy,
- impact of the fifth enlargement of the EU on both EU internal nuclear energy policy and EU external nuclear energy policy,
- impact of the hegemonization of climate change in the energy discourse.

Notions underpinning the research – that history matters, institutions matter and ideas matter - were unpicked within the analysis. The use of nuclear energy in the EU’s energy mix is highly controversial and deeply divides the governments and citizens of the Member States of the EU. As it was an integrative model first devised in the 1950s there is no apparent justification for the EU’s model of nuclear integration to continue in the twenty-first century. I have argued in my work however, that despite many controversies surrounding the use of nuclear technology, it is in the interests of all EU states, nuclear generators and non-nuclear generators to support the model of nuclear integration that has evolved.

Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Social & Political Sciences
ID Code:46295
Deposited On:01 Sep 2021 08:50

Repository Staff Only: item control page