Evaluating Trauma Informed Care training for services supporting individuals experiencing homelessness and multiple disadvantage

Burge, Rupert, Tickle, Anna and Moghaddam, Nima (2021) Evaluating Trauma Informed Care training for services supporting individuals experiencing homelessness and multiple disadvantage. Housing Care and Support, 24 (1). pp. 14-25. ISSN 1460-8790

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1108/HCS-01-2021-0002

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Evaluating Trauma Informed Care training for services supporting individuals experiencing homelessness and multiple disadvantage
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Abstract

Purpose – Implementing trauma informed care (TIC) for individuals facing
homelessness and multiple disadvantage is proposed to help both service users and
staff work effectively and therapeutically together. However, the effectiveness of
implementing TIC via training is debatable. This study explores the effects of a fourday
trauma informed care and psychologically informed environments training
package in such services.
Design and methodology – The analysis explores the effect of this training on the
degree of trauma informed care as measured by the TICOMETER, a
psychometrically robust organisational measure of TIC. The study examines group
and individual level changes from before training and again at six-month and oneyear
follow-up time-points.
Findings – At the group level analysis, three of the five TICOMETER domains
(Knowledge & Skills, Relationships, and Policies & Procedures) were higher when
compared to pre-training scores. The remaining two domains (Service Delivery and
Respect) did not improve. Individual level analysis showed some participants’ scores
decreased following training. Overall, the training appeared to modestly improve the
degree of trauma informed care as measured by the TICOMETER, and these effects
were sustained at one-year follow-up.
Research limitations – Findings are limited by the design and low response rates at
follow-up.
Originality – This paper is the first UK study to use the TICOMETER.
Practical implications – Training is necessary but not sufficient for the
implementation of TIC and needs to be complemented with wider organisational and
system level changes.

Keywords:trauma informed care, homelessness, multiple disadvantage, training, Evaluation
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:45194
Deposited On:29 Jun 2021 15:27

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