HIV viral load and pregnancy loss: Results from a population-based cohort study in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Moodley, Yoshan, Tomita, Andrew, de Oliveira, Tulio and Tanser, Frank (2021) HIV viral load and pregnancy loss: Results from a population-based cohort study in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. AIDS, 35 (5). pp. 829-833. ISSN 0269-9370

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000002799

Documents
HIV viral load and pregnancy loss: results from a population-based cohort study in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Accepted Manuscript
[img] Microsoft Word
HIV viral load _Clean_Revised_Manuscript_17Nov2020_with tables.docx - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only until 17 December 2021.

42kB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Objective: With ever-expanding antiretroviral therapy (ART) access amongst pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa, it is more than ever important to address the gap in knowledge around ART effectiveness, as measured by HIV viral load (VL), and pregnancy loss.
Design: A population-based cohort study.
Methods: The study sample consisted of 3431 pregnancies from 2835 women living with HIV aged 16-35 years old. All women participated in a population-based cohort conducted between 2004 and 2018 in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. VL data was collected at prior surveys and an HIV care registry. The closest available VL to the date that each pregnancy ended was used and classified as either a pre- or post-conception VL. Logistic regression was used to investigate the association between high VL (Log10VL >4.0 copies/ml) and pregnancy loss, defined as either a miscarriage or stillbirth.
Results: Pregnancy loss occurred at a rate of 1.3 (95% Confidence Interval, 95%CI: 1.0-1.8) per 100 pregnancies. There were 1451 pregnancies (42.3%) with post-conception VL measurements. The median time between the VL measurement and the pregnancy end date was 11.7 (Interquartile range: 5.0-25.4) months. We found a higher likelihood of pregnancy loss in women who had high VLs prior to the outcome of their pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio: 2.38, 95%CI: 1.10-5.18).
Conclusion: Given the significant relationship between high VL and pregnancy loss, our study lends further credence to ensuring effective ART through enrolment and retention of pregnant women living with HIV in ART programs, treatment adherence interventions, and VL monitoring during pregnancy.

Keywords:HIV; Viral load; Abortion, Spontaneous; Miscarriage; Stillbirth
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health
ID Code:45072
Deposited On:28 May 2021 15:00

Repository Staff Only: item control page