The Effect of Motion Direction and Eccentricity on Vection, VR sickness and Head Movements in Virtual Reality

Pohlmann, Katharina M T, Foecker, Julia, Dickinson, Patrick , Parke, Adrian and O'Hare, Louise (2021) The Effect of Motion Direction and Eccentricity on Vection, VR sickness and Head Movements in Virtual Reality. Multisensory Research . ISSN 2213-4794

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1163/22134808-bja10049

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The Effect of Motion Direction and Eccentricity on Vection, VR sickness and Head Movements in Virtual Reality
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Abstract

Virtual Reality experienced through head mounted displays often leads to vection, discomfort and sway in the user. This study investigated the effect of motion direction and eccentricity on these three phenomena using optic flow patterns displayed using the Valve Index. Visual motion stimuli were presented in the centre, periphery or far periphery and moved either in-depth (back and forth) or laterally (left and right). Overall vection was stronger for motion-in-depth compared to lateral motion. Additionally, eccentricity primarily affected stimuli moving in-depth with stronger vection for more peripherally presented motion patterns compared to more central ones. Motion direction affected the various aspects of VR sickness differently and modulated the effect of eccentricity on VR sickness. For stimuli moving in-depth far peripheral presentation caused more discomfort, whereas for lateral motion the central stimuli caused more discomfort. Stimuli moving in-depth led to more head movements in the anterior-posterior direction when the entire visual field was stimulated. Observers demonstrated more head movements in the anterior – posterior direction compared to the medio – lateral direction throughout the entire experiment independent of motion direction or eccentricity of the presented moving stimulus. Head movements were elicited on the same plane as the moving stimulus only for stimuli moving in-depth covering the entire visual field. A correlation showed a positive relationship between dizziness and vection duration and between general discomfort and sway. Identifying where in the visual field motion presented to an individual causes the least amount of VR sickness without losing vection and presence can guide development for Virtual Reality games, training and treatment programs.

Keywords:visual discomfort, VR sickness, virtual reality, vection, head movements, optic-flow
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
G Mathematical and Computer Sciences > G440 Human-computer Interaction
C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C830 Experimental Psychology
G Mathematical and Computer Sciences > G740 Computer Vision
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:44466
Deposited On:09 Apr 2021 14:36

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