Bookazines and what the Process of Producing Them Reveals About the Magazine Industry, Using Mortons Media as a Particular Case Study

Barnsley, Ian James (2019) Bookazines and what the Process of Producing Them Reveals About the Magazine Industry, Using Mortons Media as a Particular Case Study. MRes thesis, University of Lincoln.

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Bookazines and what the Process of Producing Them Reveals About the Magazine Industry, Using Mortons Media as a Particular Case Study
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Item Type:Thesis (MRes)
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Abstract

Magazine publishers are facing tough times. In most cases circulations are decreasing, fewer people are buying print magazines, as they can get much of the information they want for free online, and retailers are cutting the amount of newsstand space they have available for print products in favour of other, more profitable goods. Some publishers, like TI Media with Marie Claire as of September 2019, are no longer producing print versions of some of their magazines. Yet there remains hope for the future for print, and for many publishers the bookazine is proving to be an important weapon in their resistance against the decline. This thesis examines the nature of the bookazine as a print product, why publishers are producing them when the magazine industry is facing such challenging times, what their existence reveals about the magazine industry as a whole and its future. Very little has been written by academics and industry experts on the bookazine and why they exist and the aims of this research are to determine whether they are produced solely to make up for publishers’ magazine losses and what bookazines reveal about the wider magazine industry. This thesis argues that there is more to it than just filling the gap caused by falling magazine sales. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 magazine industry professionals at publishers that produce bookazines or similar print products and their views were compared with those of staff at one particular bookazine publisher, Mortons Media Group Ltd, in a case study. Analysis of the responses shows that although primarily bookazines are produced to bring much-needed extra revenue, that revenue itself is modest and there is much more to it than filling a gap, as bookazines are seen as a part of a wider, multi-platform strategy to raise the profile of publishers’ key brands, which bring in money in a number of other ways, including magazines, websites and events. Publishers are also keen to diversify their revenue streams to avoid being overly-reliant on one or two, including magazines, and thus more susceptible to volatility in those markets. The thesis concludes by suggesting how publishers like Mortons Media Group can make best use of its bookazines and other opportunities to promote its brands and prosper as a business, such as developing more partnerships with retailers and outside organisations with its bookazines and magazines and it also observes how by making bookazines, magazine publishers like Mortons are driving the evolution of magazines from products that once resembled books at the beginning in the 18th century, through to the traditional view of the glossy full-colour magazine, to something more akin to a book again, and even turning to publishing books themselves.

Divisions:College of Arts > School of English & Journalism > School of English & Journalism (Journalism)
ID Code:44213
Deposited On:04 Mar 2021 12:35

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