Social Media as a Form of Virtual Whistleblowing: Empirical Evidence for Elements of the Diamond Model

Latan, Hengky, Jabbour, Charbel Jose Chiappetta and Lopes de Sousa Jabbour, Beatriz Social Media as a Form of Virtual Whistleblowing: Empirical Evidence for Elements of the Diamond Model. Journal of Business Ethics . ISSN 0167-4544

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-020-04598-y

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

This article originally advances the field of organizational whistleblowing by empirically investigating the suitability of the four elements of the fraud diamond as a means to understand the intention to disclose wrongdoing through virtual channels. This article also makes a contribution on the theme of whistleblowing as it relates to customers, an under-studied, however, relevant stakeholder in this field. The main findings of the article are as follows: (a) the four elements of the fraud diamond as they relate to whistleblowing—a combination of pressure, financial incentive, opportunity and rationalization, and capability—can explain the intentions behind customer reports of wrongdoing; (b) online social media channels are customers’ preferred means of whistleblowing; (c) the elements of opportunity and capability are strongly correlated with the use of social media as a method of disclosing wrongdoing; and (d) virtual channels can be useful for whistleblowers in order to avoid potential retaliation. Unique managerial and academic implications of these research findings are also discussed, extending the layers of knowledge on whistleblowing in organizations.

Keywords:Business ethics · Online whistleblowing · Pressure · Financial incentive · Opportunity · Rationalization · Capability
Divisions:Lincoln International Business School
ID Code:43451
Deposited On:18 Dec 2020 13:24

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