The Effect of Rural Residence on Cancer-Related Self-Efficacy with UK Cancer Survivors Following Treatment

Nelson, David, Law, Graham, Mcgonagle, Ian , Turner, Paul, Jackson, Christine and Kane, Ros (2020) The Effect of Rural Residence on Cancer-Related Self-Efficacy with UK Cancer Survivors Following Treatment. Journal of Rural Health . ISSN 0890-765X

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/jrh.12549

Documents
The Effect of Rural Residence on Cancer-Related Self-Efficacy with UK Cancer Survivors Following Treatment
Authors' Accepted Manuscript

Request a copy
[img] Microsoft Word
JRH_Nelson et al_2020_Rural_Cancer.docx - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only until 2 December 2021.

36kB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Purpose: To examine rural and urban differences in cancer-related self-efficacy with UK cancer survivors following treatment.
Methods: A cross-sectional postal survey with post-treatment cancer survivors in the East Midlands of England. The survey collected data on demographics and cancer-related self-efficacy using the Cancer Survivors Self-Efficacy Scale. Rural-urban residence was determined using Office for National Statistics classifications. Linear Regression models were developed using a Directed Acyclic Graph that determined confounding variables. When the model deviated from normal the outcome variable was transformed using the Box-Cox transformation.
Findings: Of those surveyed, 227 responded, of whom 58% were female and 45% lived in a rural area. A linear regression model showed a significant increase in cancer-related self-efficacy in cancer survivors living in rural areas compared to urban residents (0.76, 95% CI: 0.25-1.27), although the residual plot deviated from a normal distribution. A model of the effect of rural living on a Box-Cox transformed outcome variable confirmed an increased cancer-related self-efficacy score in rural regions (9.06, 95% CI: 2.97-15.14). Rural living remained significant (7.98, 95% CI: 1.78-14.19) after adjustment for the respondents’ income. Similarly adjusting for deprivation led to a significant increase in cancer-related self-efficacy in rural regions (8.64, 95% CI: 2.48-14.79).
Conclusion: This study has important implications when considering the impact of location of residence on cancer-related self-efficacy in cancer survivorship. The role of deprivation had some impact for sample respondents in both the urban and rural environment and merits further analysis.

Keywords:cancer survivorship, rural health, rural-urban, Self-efficacy, self-management
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
L Social studies > L510 Health & Welfare
A Medicine and Dentistry > A900 Others in Medicine and Dentistry
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health
College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:43115
Deposited On:09 Dec 2020 10:41

Repository Staff Only: item control page