CACNA1C methylation; Association with Cortisol, Perceived Stress, rs1006737 and Childhood Trauma in Males

Pennington, Kyla, Klaus, Kristel, Fachim, Helene , Trischel, Ksenia, Butler, Kevin A., Heald, Adrian, Dalton, Caroline F. and Reynolds, Gavin (2020) CACNA1C methylation; Association with Cortisol, Perceived Stress, rs1006737 and Childhood Trauma in Males. Epigenomics . ISSN 1750-1911

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CACNA1C methylation; Association with Cortisol, Perceived Stress, rs1006737 and Childhood Trauma in Males
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Abstract

Aim: We investigated morning cortisol, stress, rs1006737 and childhood trauma relationship
with CACNA1C methylation. Materials & Methods: Morning cortisol release, childhood
trauma and perceived stress were collected and genotyping for rs1006737 conducted in 103
adult males. Genomic DNA extracted from saliva was bisulphite converted and using
pyrosequencing methylation determined at 11 CpG sites within intron 3 of CACNA1C.
Results: A significant negative correlation between waking cortisol and overall mean
methylation was found and a positive correlation between CpG5 methylation and perceived
stress. Conclusion: CACNA1C methylation levels may be related to cortisol release and stress
perception. Future work should evaluate the influence of altered CACNA1C methylation on
stress reactivity to investigate this as a potential mechanism for mental health vulnerability.

Keywords:CACNA1C; rs1006737; DNA methylation; childhood trauma; cortisol; stress
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C420 Human Genetics
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B140 Neuroscience
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:42844
Deposited On:02 Nov 2020 11:42

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