Entrance into parenthood at the onset of low fertility in Ukraine: The role of family relationships and perceived security

Hilevych, Yuliya (2020) Entrance into parenthood at the onset of low fertility in Ukraine: The role of family relationships and perceived security. Demographic Research, 42 . pp. 799-826. ISSN 1435-9871

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.4054/DEMRES.2020.42.29

Documents
Entrance into parenthood at the onset of low fertility in Ukraine: The role of family relationships and perceived security
Published Open Access Manuscript
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
__network.uni_staff_S1_cjoyner_Downloads_Frank Tanser_hilevych demographic research.pdf - Whole Document
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

521kB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

BACKGROUND In post-Soviet countries, low fertility has been achieved through postponement of second birth, while entrance into parenthood still takes place relatively early in life and within marriage. Studies suggest that grandparental support with childcare drives this reproductive behaviour. However, we still know little about the exact way in which decisions about first parenthood are shaped by family relationships, especially with respect to the expected and actual support they exert. OBJECTIVE This paper explores how family relationships – spousal and intergenerational – influenced decisions to enter parenthood in Ukraine between 1950 and 1975, when fertility there declined below the replacement level for the first time. METHODS A total of 66 qualitative life-history interviews were conducted with women and men from the Ukrainian cities of Lviv (west) and Kharkiv (east); age-specific fertility rates and the total fertility rate in 1960 were measured for the two provinces. RESULTS The informants shared their notions about the right timing for first parenthood, which parents(-in-law) helped them to navigate. This guidance, in turn, created expectations about the provision of help with childcare, which facilitated a feeling of security when entering parenthood in economically insecure circumstances, which are defined as perceived security. The actual provision of childcare by parents(-in-law), however, was contingent on spousal relationships, which differed between the two cities. These differences are important for understanding postponement of second birth and regional variation in achieving low fertility in Ukraine.

Keywords:first parenthood, intergenerational relationships, low fertility, perceived security, qualitative interviews, social influence, spousal relationships, Ukraine
Subjects:L Social studies > L300 Sociology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Social & Political Sciences
ID Code:41671
Deposited On:11 Aug 2020 12:02

Repository Staff Only: item control page