Empirical investigation to explore potential gains from the amalgamation of Phase Changing Materials (PCMs) and wood shavings

Mohammed, Adham, Elnokaly, Amira and M.Alya, Abdel Monteleb (2020) Empirical investigation to explore potential gains from the amalgamation of Phase Changing Materials (PCMs) and wood shavings. Energy and Built Environment . ISSN 2666-1233

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbenv.2020.07.001

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Empirical investigation to explore potential gains from the amalgamation of Phase Changing Materials (PCMs) and wood shavings
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Abstract

The reduction of gained heat, heat peak shifting and the mitigation of air temperature fluctuations are some desirable properties that are sought after in any thermal insulation system. It cannot be overstated that these factors, in addition to others, govern the performance of such systems thus their effect on indoor ambient conditions. The effect of such systems extends also to Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that are set up to operate optimally in certain conditions. Where literature shows that PCMs and natural materials such as wood-shavings can provide efficient passive insulation for buildings, it is evident that such approaches utilise methods that are of a degree of intricacy which requires specialist knowledge and complex techniques, such as micro-encapsulation for instance. With technical and economic aspects in mind, an amalgam of PCM and wood-shavings has been created for the purpose of being utilised as a feasible thermal insulation. The amalgamation was performed in the simplest of methods, through submerging the wood shavings in PCM. An experimental procedure was devised to test the thermal performance of the amalgam and compare this to the performance of the same un-amalgamated materials. Comparative analysis revealed that no significant thermal gains would be expected from such amalgamation. However, significant reduction in the total weight of the insulation system would be achieved that, in this case, shown to be up to 20.94%. Thus, further reducing possible strains on structural elements due to the application of insulation on buildings. This can be especially beneficial in vernacular architectural approaches where considerably large amounts and thicknesses of insulations are used. In addition, cost reduction could be attained as wood shavings are significantly cheaper compared to the cost of PCMs.

Keywords:PCMs; Heat peak; Thermal performance; Wood shavings; By-products
Subjects:H Engineering > H221 Energy Resources
H Engineering > H210 Structural Engineering
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K100 Architecture
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K990 Architecture, Building and Planning not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Architecture and the Built Environment
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ID Code:41528
Deposited On:20 Jul 2020 08:24

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