Reducing dropout in acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness‐based cognitive therapy, and problem‐solving therapy for chronic pain and cancer patients using motivational interviewing

Malins, Sam, Biswas, Sanchia, Rathbone, James , Vogt, William, Pye, Naomi, Levene, Jo, Moghaddam, Nima and Russell, John (2020) Reducing dropout in acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness‐based cognitive therapy, and problem‐solving therapy for chronic pain and cancer patients using motivational interviewing. British Journal of Clinical Psychology . ISSN 2044-8260

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjc.12254

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Reducing dropout in acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness‐based cognitive therapy, and problem‐solving therapy for chronic pain and cancer patients using motivational interviewing
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Abstract

Objective
Acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness‐based cognitive therapy, and problem‐solving therapy are types of cognitive‐behavioural therapy (CBT) group that improve physical and mental health in chronic pain or cancer. However, dropout is high due to group demands alongside physical impairments. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a well‐evidenced means of enhancing treatment adherence. Few studies have investigated MI as an adjunct to CBT in cancer or chronic pain, and none have established the minimum MI duration required for adherence improvement. This study evaluated minimal‐duration MI to improve adherence in three CBT group types for cancer and chronic pain.

Methods
In a cohort study of 99 cancer and chronic pain patients, 47 were given a 10‐ to 15‐min structured MI telephone intervention (MI‐call) after the first session. The remaining 52 received a CBT group without MI (no‐MI).

Results
Odds of completing group CBTs were five times greater for patients in the MI‐call cohort versus no‐MI. Effects remained when controlling for age, gender, diagnosis, group type, and baseline quality of life. The MI‐call cohort attended one extra session per patient compared to no‐MI, controlling for age, gender, and diagnosis.

Conclusions
A brief MI telephone intervention may improve adherence to group CBTs in cancer and chronic pain.

Keywords:motivational interviewing, cognitive-behavioural therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, cancer, Chronic pain, Adherence, dropout
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:41002
Deposited On:07 Jul 2020 13:51

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