Factors associated with HIV in younger and older adult men in South Africa: findings from a cross-sectional survey.

Kaymarlin, Govender, Beckett, Sean Edward, George, Gavin , Lewis, Lara, Cawood, Cherie, Khanyile, David, Tanser, Frank and Kharsany, Ayesha BM (2019) Factors associated with HIV in younger and older adult men in South Africa: findings from a cross-sectional survey. BMJ Open, 9 . e03166. ISSN 0

Full content URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031667

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Objective This study investigated the behavioural, psychosocial and biological factors associated with HIV in a younger group of men (15 to 24 years) compared with an older group of men (25 to 35 years).
Design A household-based, cross-sectional study was conducted.
Setting Men were randomly selected using a two-stage random sampling method in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, between June 2014 and June 2015.
Participants Overall, we interviewed 1472 younger men and 1138 older men. Only participants who could speak English or Zulu, were able to provide informed consent and who were expected to be living in the study area for the next 12 months were enrolled into the study.
Primary and secondary outcomes HIV status was the primary outcome for the study. Men’s HIV status was derived from blood samples collected in the study which were tested for HIV antibodies.
Results HIV prevalence was higher among older men (35.4%, 95% CI: 31.7 to 39.1) than younger men (7.6%, 95% CI: 6.2 to 9.4, p<0.01). Older men, who completed secondary school had a lower likelihood of being HIV positive (adjusted OR (AOR): 0.41, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.63, p<0.001) and those with greater food insecurity had a higher likelihood of being HIV positive (AOR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.05 to 2.34, p=0.04). Younger men with a higher number of lifetime sexual partners had a higher likelihood of being HIV positive (AOR: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.99 to 1.09, p=0.09).
Conclusion Given that the HIV prevalence is higher in the older men, community based interventions need to target older men for medical circumcision and support HIV positive men to improve their material conditions early. For younger men intervening to reduce HIV risk behaviours at a young age before these behaviours become entrenched should be central to HIV prevention programmes.

Keywords:HIV
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Institute of Health
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ID Code:40060
Deposited On:06 Mar 2020 11:48

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