Non-parental childcare, time pressure and the gendered division of paid work, domestic work and parental childcare

Craig, L. and Powell, A. (2013) Non-parental childcare, time pressure and the gendered division of paid work, domestic work and parental childcare. Community, Work and Family, 16 (1). pp. 100-119. ISSN 1366-8803

Full content URL: http://doi.org/10.1080/13668803.2012.722013

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

What impact does out-sourcing childcare have on the time parents spend on paid work, domestic work and childcare, and how they share these tasks between themselves? Using data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Time Use Survey (TUS) 2006 we investigate the effects of formal and informal non-parental childcare on the time use of couples with children aged 0-4 years (N=348). We examine associations between non-parental care and (1) couples' combined time in paid work, domestic work and childcare, (2) parents' time separately by gender in paid work, domestic work and childcare (subdivided by activity type) and (3) parents' self-reported time pressure. Total workloads (the sum of paid work, domestic work and childcare) are neither higher nor lower when non-parental care is used, either for households combined or for each gender separately. The way time is spent, and how activities are divided by gender does differ, however. For mothers the use of any non-parental care and more hours in formal care is associated with more paid work hours, less childcare time and higher self-reported time pressure. Fathers' time is more constant, but they report higher subjective time pressure with increasing hours of formal non-parental care. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Additional Information:cited By 12
Divisions:College of Social Science
ID Code:39977
Deposited On:27 Jan 2020 15:05

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