Designing robust and revisable policies for gender equality: lessons from the Australian construction industry

Galea, N., Powell, A., Loosemore, M. and Chappell, L. (2015) Designing robust and revisable policies for gender equality: lessons from the Australian construction industry. Construction Management and Economics, 33 (5-6). pp. 375-389. ISSN 0144-6193

Full content URL: http://doi.org/10.1080/01446193.2015.1042887

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

The construction industry remains the most male dominated sector in Australia. Several decades of formal gender equality initiatives by government and business have failed to bring about any meaningful change to the hierarchical and numerical representation of women in the sector. Drawing on new institutionalism, particularly the concepts of ‘robustness’ and ‘revisability’, the nature and intent of formal policies and programs that impact on gender equality are analysed in two large Australian multinational construction firms. Through in-depth interviews with senior management and a document analysis of formal policies, it is concluded that gender equality initiatives and broader policies are primarily focused on increasing the numbers of women in construction rather than addressing gender practices and outcomes. These policies lack many of the qualities of robustness and revisability, which impacts on their capacity to genuinely challenge the gendered norms, practices and narratives of the sector. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

Additional Information:cited By 23
Divisions:College of Social Science
ID Code:39971
Deposited On:27 Jan 2020 14:48

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