Gender differences in working at home and time use patterns: evidence from Australia

Powell, A. and Craig, L. (2015) Gender differences in working at home and time use patterns: evidence from Australia. Work, Employment and Society, 29 (4). pp. 571-589. ISSN 0950-0170

Full content URL: http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017014568140

Documents
Gender differences in working at home and time use patterns: evidence from Australia
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
Powell & Craig (2015) Gender WAH.pdf - Whole Document

298kB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Despite a wealth of research on working at home, few studies have examined the effects of working at home in relation to its regularity and fewer still have used time use studies to do so. Using data from the 2006 Australian Time Use Survey this article investigates the association between working at home, gender and time use, in relation to amount of time spent in paid work, unpaid work and recreational labour, as well as multi-tasking, fragmentation of time and scheduling flexibility. It examines time use patterns according to whether employees do no work at home or whether they work at home rarely, occasionally or regularly. Results show there is an association between working at home and time in paid and unpaid work and that this differs by the regularity of working at home and gender. Working at home does not create more time for recreational labour, although it may help women juggle work and family. © 2015, © The Author(s) 2015.

Additional Information:cited By 10
Divisions:College of Social Science
ID Code:39969
Deposited On:27 Jan 2020 14:42

Repository Staff Only: item control page