The importance of first impression judgements in interspecies interactions

Clark, Laura, Butler, Kevin, Ritchie, Kay and Marechal, Laetitia (2020) The importance of first impression judgements in interspecies interactions. Scientific Reports, 10 . p. 2218. ISSN 2045-2322

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-58867-x

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The importance of first impression judgements in interspecies interactions
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Abstract

Close human-wildlife interactions are rapidly growing, particularly due to wildlife tourism popularity. Using both laboratory and ecological observation studies we explored potential interspecies communication signalling mechanisms underpinning human-animal approach behaviour, which to date have been unclear. First impression ratings (n = 227) of Barbary macaques’ social and health traits were related to the macaques’ facial morphology and their observed behaviour supporting a shared facial signalling system in primates. These ratings significantly predicted intended approach to the macaques during hypothetical interactions. Finally, real-world interspecies proximity was observed and found to be best predicted by the interaction between human first impression perception and animal behaviour. Specifically, perceived macaque health in interaction with actual macaque dominance drives close interactions despite human proclivity to avoid dominant animals, raising safety concerns in interspecies interactions.

Keywords:First impression judgements, interspecies communication, Barbary macaques, human-animal interactions
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D320 Animal Health
C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C810 Applied Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C120 Behavioural Biology
C Biological Sciences > C890 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:39934
Deposited On:27 Jan 2020 09:04

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