Phylogenetically structured variance in felid bite force: The role of phylogeny in the evolution of biting performance

Sakamoto, Manabu, Lloyd, G.T. and Benton, M.J. (2010) Phylogenetically structured variance in felid bite force: The role of phylogeny in the evolution of biting performance. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 23 (3). pp. 463-478. ISSN 1420-9101

Full content URL: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01922.x

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

A key question in evolution is the degree to which morphofunctional complexes are constrained by phylogeny. We investigated the role of phylogeny in the evolution of biting performance, quantified as bite forces, using phylogenetic eigenvector regression. Results indicate that there are strong phylogenetic signals in both absolute and size‐adjusted bite forces, although it is weaker in the latter. This indicates that elimination of size influences reduces the level of phylogenetic inertia and that the majority of the phylogenetic constraint is a result of size. Tracing the evolution of bite force through phylogeny by character optimization also supports this notion, in that relative bite force is randomly distributed across phylogeny whereas absolute bite force diverges according to clade. The nonphylogenetically structured variance in bite force could not be sufficiently explained by species‐unique morphology or by ecology. This study demonstrates the difficulties in identifying causes of nonphylogenetically structured variance in morphofunctional character complexes.

Additional Information:cited By 23
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:39559
Deposited On:17 Jan 2020 11:53

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