Haptic Feedback in Virtual Reality: An Investigation Into The Next Step of First Person Perspective Presence

Chapman, Alex (2019) Haptic Feedback in Virtual Reality: An Investigation Into The Next Step of First Person Perspective Presence. MRes thesis, University of Lincoln.

Documents
Haptic Feedback in Virtual Reality: An Investigation Into The Next Step of First Person Perspective Presence
Thesis
[img]
[Download]
[img] PDF
Chapman Alex - Computer Science - January 2019.pdf - Whole Document

2MB
Item Type:Thesis (MRes)
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Video games are becoming progressively sophisticated with new interesting
mechanics and increasingly realistic graphics. Game technologies manufacturers
are constantly striving to find innovative ways of providing additional layers of
interactivity, and engagement with the player. In video games haptic feedback
has traditionally been delivered by motors and pulleys through interfaces such
as steering wheels and joysticks, or via a simple vibration mechanism in the
controllers. However, while the growing popularity of commercial virtual reality
technologies has provided video game developers with a new modality to introduce
greater levels of immersion and presence into games, haptic technology in gaming
has kept to its traditional roots.

In this thesis we investigate the impact that haptic feedback has on player presence
within virtual reality environments. We introduce a non-intrusive haptic interface
that can be used alongside consumer grade virtual reality technology. This thesis
will demonstrate the implementation and technical considerations made during
the construction of this device. We then demonstrate the systems effectiveness
through a user study evaluating users reactions towards the system when compared
with traditional vibration-based haptics and with the absence of any feedback, in
a virtual reality game environment.

The results from this study show a positive impact on player presence when using
the non-intrusive haptic device, with broken down presence scores suggesting the
device was successful in delivering a satisfying haptic experience. Results also
indicate an improvement in the way participants perceive their own performance
when using the device, with presence scores suggesting this is due to participants
being able to fully place themselves in the experience.

Subjects:G Mathematical and Computer Sciences > G400 Computer Science
Divisions:College of Science > School of Computer Science
ID Code:38911
Deposited On:18 Nov 2019 10:53

Repository Staff Only: item control page