Using Smart-Messaging to Enhance Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer Patients: A Mixed Methods Proof of Concept Evaluation

Wells, Chloe, Malins, Sam, Clarke, Simon , Skorodzien, Iwona, Biswas, Sanchia, Sweeney, Tim, Moghaddam, Nima and Levene, Jo (2020) Using Smart-Messaging to Enhance Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer Patients: A Mixed Methods Proof of Concept Evaluation. Psycho-Oncology . ISSN 1099-1611

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.5256

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Abstract

Objective. Depression and anxiety lead to reduced treatment adherence, poorer quality of
life, and increased care costs amongst cancer patients. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy
(MBCT) is an effective treatment, but dropout reduces potential benefits. Smart-message
reminders can prevent dropout and improve effectiveness. However, smart-messaging is
untested for MBCT in cancer. This study evaluates smart-messaging to reduce dropout and
improve effectiveness in MBCT for cancer patients with depression or anxiety.

Methods. Fifty-one cancer patients attending MBCT in a psycho-oncology service were
offered a smart-messaging intervention, which reminded them of prescribed between-session
activities. Thirty patients accepted smart-messaging and 21 did not. Assessments of
depression and anxiety were taken at baseline, session-by-session and one-month follow-up.
Logistic regression and multilevel modelling compared the groups on treatment completion
and clinical effectiveness. Fifteen post-treatment patient interviews explored smartmessaging
use.

Results. The odds of programme completion were eight times greater for patients using
smart-messaging compared with non-users, controlling for age, gender, baseline
depression, and baseline anxiety (OR = 7.79, 95% CI 1.75 to 34.58, p = .007). Smartmessaging
users also reported greater improvement in depression over the programme (B = -
2.33, SEB = .78, p = .004), when controlling for baseline severity, change over time, age, and
number of sessions attended. There was no difference between groups in anxiety
improvement (B = -1.46, SEB = .86, p = .097). In interviews, smart-messaging was described
as a motivating reminder and source of personal connection.

Conclusions. Smart-messaging may be an easily integrated telehealth intervention to
improve MBCT for cancer patients.

Keywords:cancer, oncology, mindfulness, Telehealth, dropout, cognitive therapy
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C841 Health Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:37629
Deposited On:08 Oct 2019 09:42

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