Type tells tales

Tullett, Barrie, Wood, Philippa, Marinetti, Filippo Tommaso, Werkman, Hendrik Nicolaas, Cage, John, Ting, Walasse, Bui, Antonius, McDonough, Dylan, Hagner, Dirk, Crawford, Allen, Bunsas, Bianca, Inclusus, Herman, Antônio, Pedro, Anhorn, Gabriel, Lehrer, Warren, Picabia, Francis, Lionni, Leo, Massin, Robert, Kalman, Maira, Leach, Molly, Sharpe, Stuart, Hannah, Jonny, Hingston, Tom, Blegvad, Peter, Swainson, Andrew, King, Patrick, Scher, Paula, Soleri, Paulo, Drucker, Johanna, Eckersley, Richard, Hendrix, John, Seiffert, Isabel, Fosberg, Lora, Rosenwald, Laurie, Passafiume, John, Reeve, Nick, Cohen, Natali, Vought, Annie, Summerford, Jack, Munday, Oliver, Sewell, Carolyn, Sayer, Alida, Spanier, Ariane, Rea, Brian, Patrick, Daniel, Goodman, Timothy, Eckersley, Rogers, Zlatkov, Kiril, Winston, Sam, Sena, Damián, Mazali Pilar, Hermes, Bergez, González, Depero, Fortunato, Kent, Corita, Bantjes, Marian, Costa, Cyla, Morcos, Wael, Heath, Ebon, Butler, Angie, Diesel, Chank, Ulku, Anne, Bagdonas, Brian Scott, Clarke, Jamie, Permenter, Jason, Munari, Bruno, Cumptich, Roberto de Vicq de, MacDonald, Ross, Glaser, Milton and Glaser, Shirley (2017) Type tells tales. Thames & Hudson, London, pp. 34-37. ISBN 9780500420577

Full content URL: https://thamesandhudson.com/type-tells-tales-97805...

Others
Type Tells Tales
Publishers Webpage for book.
[img]
[Download]
[img] HTML
type-tells-tales-9780500420577 - Other

87kB
Item Type:Book or Monograph
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Type Tells Tales focuses on typography that is integral to the message or story it is expressing. This is type that speaks – that is literally the voice of the narrator. And the narrator is the typographer. This can be quite literal, for example when letters come from the mouth of a person or thing, as in a comics balloon. It can be hand lettering, drawn with its own distinctive peculiarities that convey personality and mood. Precedents for contemporary work might be in Apollinaire’s calligram ‘Il pleut’ or Kurt Schwitters’ children’s picture book The Scarecrow, or in Concrete Poetry, Futurist ‘Words in Freedom’ or Dadaist collage.

Seeking out examples in the furthest reaches of graphic design, Steven Heller and Gail Anderson uncover work that reveals how type can be used to render a particular voice or multiple conversations, how letters can be used in various shapes and sizes to create a kind of typographic pantomime, and how type can become both content and illustration as in, for example Paul Rand’s ‘ROARRRRR’. Letters take the shape and form of other things, such as people, faces, animals, cars or planes. There are examples of how typographic blocks, paragraphs, sentences and blurbs can be used to guide the eye through dense information.

Keywords:Typography, Art, Typewriter Art, Letterpress, Graphic Design, Steven Heller, Gail Anderson, Thames & Hudson, Typographic Dante
Subjects:W Creative Arts and Design > W100 Fine Art
W Creative Arts and Design > W211 Typography
W Creative Arts and Design > W120 Painting
W Creative Arts and Design > W830 Prose Writing
W Creative Arts and Design > W220 Illustration
W Creative Arts and Design > W213 Visual Communication
W Creative Arts and Design > W110 Drawing
W Creative Arts and Design > W820 Poetry Writing
W Creative Arts and Design > W210 Graphic Design
W Creative Arts and Design > W800 Imaginative Writing
W Creative Arts and Design > W140 Printmaking
Divisions:College of Arts > School of Architecture & Design > School of Architecture & Design (Design)
ID Code:30340
Deposited On:15 Mar 2018 15:49

Repository Staff Only: item control page