Investigating the effect of exercise, cognitive and dual-task interventions upon cognitive function in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Cooke, Samuel, Jones, Arwel, Bridle, Christopher, Smith, Mark F., Pennington, Kyla and Curtis, Ffion (2017) Investigating the effect of exercise, cognitive and dual-task interventions upon cognitive function in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Psychology Presence in the Midlands 2017, 13 Sept 2017, Derby.

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29151 BPS East Midlands Branch Conference 2017 - abstracts booklet.pdf - Abstract

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Item Type:Conference or Workshop contribution (Presentation)
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Objectives/purpose:
Whilst exercise, cognitive, and dual-task interventions have been shown
to improve cognitive function within a healthy aging population, it remains
unclear as to what effect such interventions may have in a type 2
diabetes mellitus (T2DM) population.
Design:
Systematic review/meta-analyses.
Methods:
Databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science,
ClinicalTrial.gov, Cochrane register of controlled trials, Prospero, HTA,
and DARE) of published, unpublished, and ongoing studies were
searched for randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of
exercise, cognitive and dual-task interventions upon cognitive function in
T2DM.
Results:
This review identified three studies investigating the effects of an
exercise intervention and one study investigating the effect of a cognitive
intervention upon cognitive function in T2DM. Meta-analyses indicated a
significant effect of exercise for improving global cognitive function (minimental
state examination P<0.05) and inhibitory control (Stroop task
P<0.05) but not working memory (digit symbol P=0.35). Calculated effect
sizes of outcome measures in the cognitive study indicated a beneficial
effect of cognitive training upon cognitive function in T2DM. The risk of
bias assessment in this review was hindered predominantly by poor
reporting practices of included studies. Due to incomplete reporting of
12
methodological procedures, two studies were judged to have a high risk
of overall bias whilst the remaining two were judged as having a
moderate overall risk of bias.
Conclusions:
The findings of the present systematic review and meta-analyses provide
evidence for exercise and cognitive interventions improving cognitive
function in T2DM. The poor reporting practices of included studies
means that future research in this area should identify relevant reporting
guidelines (e.g. CONSORT) to reduce the risk of bias and facilitate
transparent reporting.

Keywords:healthcare, Exercise
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
Related URLs:
ID Code:29151
Deposited On:16 Oct 2017 14:42

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