Changing Zuluness; capturing the mercurial indigenous vernacular architecture of the eastern seaboard of Southern Africa

Whelan, Deborah (2006) Changing Zuluness; capturing the mercurial indigenous vernacular architecture of the eastern seaboard of Southern Africa. Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, 17 (2). pp. 71-82. ISSN 1050-2092

Full content URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/41758316

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Changing Zuluness: Capturing the Mercurial Indigenous Vernacular Architecture of the Eastern Seaboard of Southern Africa

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Abstract

Many consider the beehive grass iqhugwana archetypically Zulu. Along with the shield and assegai, it is iconic in the tourism culture of “the Zulu Kingdom,” representing the maintenance of an exotic “tradition.”1 I argue that this is not necessarily so, as historical material shows evidence of a continual adaptation and evolution of this form. Furthermore, using the more contemporary example of the decorated buildings of Msinga, I suggest that the recent vernacular environment is a result of a postglobal Africanization, in a geographic area that, due to its circumstances, may have missed out on the globalization phenomenon completely.

Additional Information:The final published version of this article can be accessed online at https://www.jstor.org/stable/41758316?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
Keywords:Zulu, indigneous vernacular architecture, Msinga
Subjects:K Architecture, Building and Planning > K190 Architecture not elsewhere classified
L Social studies > L610 Social and Cultural Anthropology
Divisions:College of Arts > School of Architecture & Design > School of Architecture & Design (Architecture)
ID Code:28976
Deposited On:25 Oct 2018 15:03

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