The effects of cognitive style on research supervision: a study of student-supervisor dyads in management education

Armstrong, Steven J., Allinson, Christopher W. and Hayes, John (2004) The effects of cognitive style on research supervision: a study of student-supervisor dyads in management education. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 3 (1). pp. 41-63. ISSN 1537-260X

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Abstract

Whilst attention has been paid to many aspects of teaching and learning in management education, one facet that has been seriously overlooked is the process of research supervision. Research at both the graduate and the undergraduate level suggests that the relationship between the student and the supervisor is a significant predictor of success and failure in independent research projects. One personality variable that has been shown to be partly responsible for shaping the overall effectiveness of such relationships is cognitive style, defined as consistent individual differences in how we perceive, organize and process information, solve problems, learn and relate to others. This study examined the effects of differences and similarities in the analytic-intuitive dimension of cognitive style on the supervision process. Data were collected from both partners in 421 dyadic relationships, each comprising an academic supervisor and a management student undertaking a major research project. Findings suggest that analytic supervisors were perceived to be significantly more nurturing and less dominant than their more intuitive counterparts, indicating a higher degree of closeness in their relationships. This led to increased liking in the relationship, and significantly higher performance outcomes for the student. These effects were highest in dyads whose students and supervisors were more analytic.

Keywords:research supervision cognitive style
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N200 Management studies
Divisions:Lincoln International Business School
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ID Code:26661
Deposited On:08 Mar 2017 09:40

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