Functional coupling between the limbs during bimanual reach-to-grasp movements

Jackson, G. M. and German, K. and Peacock, K. (2002) Functional coupling between the limbs during bimanual reach-to-grasp movements. Human Movement Science, 21 (3). pp. 5-21. ISSN 0167-9457

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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0167-9457(02)00118-5

Abstract

While it is frequently advantageous to be able to use our hands independently, many actions demand that we use our hands co-operatively. In this paper we present two experiments that examine functional binding between the limbs during the execution of bimanual reach-to-grasp movements. The first experiment examines the effect of gaze direction on unimanual and bimanual reaches. Even when subjects’ eye movements are restricted during bimanual reaches so that they may only foveate one target object, the limbs remain tightly synchronized to a common movement duration. In contrast, grip aperture is independently scaled to the size of the target for each hand. The second experiment demonstrates however, that the independent scaling of grip aperture is task dependent. If the two target objects are unified so that they appear to be part of a single object, grip apertures become more similar across the hands (i.e., grip aperture to the large target object is reduced in size while peak aperture to the small target item is increased in size). These results suggest that the coupling of the limbs can operate at a functional level

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:While it is frequently advantageous to be able to use our hands independently, many actions demand that we use our hands co-operatively. In this paper we present two experiments that examine functional binding between the limbs during the execution of bimanual reach-to-grasp movements. The first experiment examines the effect of gaze direction on unimanual and bimanual reaches. Even when subjects’ eye movements are restricted during bimanual reaches so that they may only foveate one target object, the limbs remain tightly synchronized to a common movement duration. In contrast, grip aperture is independently scaled to the size of the target for each hand. The second experiment demonstrates however, that the independent scaling of grip aperture is task dependent. If the two target objects are unified so that they appear to be part of a single object, grip apertures become more similar across the hands (i.e., grip aperture to the large target object is reduced in size while peak aperture to the small target item is increased in size). These results suggest that the coupling of the limbs can operate at a functional level
Keywords:Bimanual co-ordination, Gaze, Interference, Kinematics, Object perception
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B120 Physiology
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:972
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:13 Jul 2007
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:24

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