The role of sight of the hand in the development of prehension in childhood

Smyth, Mary M. and Peacock, Kirsty A. and Katamba, Janet A. (2004) The role of sight of the hand in the development of prehension in childhood. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology Section A, 57 (2). pp. 269-296. ISSN 1747-1226, 1747-0218

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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02724980343000215

Abstract

In two studies, children between 5 and 10 years of age were asked to reach to grasp an object without sight of the hand during the movement. The oldest children and adults were faster when they could see the hand and increased maximum grip aperture when they could not see the hand. The 10-year-olds were less able to integrate grasp and lift than adults when they could see their hands. Children aged 5 and 6 showed no increase in movement time when they could not see the hand and did not adapt maximum grip aperture to lack of sight. These effects remained when children were encouraged to reach for and lift the target as quickly as possible. The results indicate that younger children did not give preference to vision in the control of prehension, while older children used visual feedback to improve efficiency. Dependence on sight of the hand for the control of prehension does not simply decrease with age, but it may be integrated into an anticipatory control strategy where it contributes to the efficiency of control.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:In two studies, children between 5 and 10 years of age were asked to reach to grasp an object without sight of the hand during the movement. The oldest children and adults were faster when they could see the hand and increased maximum grip aperture when they could not see the hand. The 10-year-olds were less able to integrate grasp and lift than adults when they could see their hands. Children aged 5 and 6 showed no increase in movement time when they could not see the hand and did not adapt maximum grip aperture to lack of sight. These effects remained when children were encouraged to reach for and lift the target as quickly as possible. The results indicate that younger children did not give preference to vision in the control of prehension, while older children used visual feedback to improve efficiency. Dependence on sight of the hand for the control of prehension does not simply decrease with age, but it may be integrated into an anticipatory control strategy where it contributes to the efficiency of control.
Keywords:Prehension, Vision, Hand
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C820 Developmental Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C141 Developmental Biology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:971
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:13 Jul 2007
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:24

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