Homogenisation, nationalism and war: should we still read Ernest Gellner?

Conversi, Daniele (2007) Homogenisation, nationalism and war: should we still read Ernest Gellner? Nations and Nationalism, 13 (3). pp. 371-394. ISSN 1354-5078

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Homogenisation, nationalism and war: should we still read Ernest Gellner?
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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8129.2007.00292.x

Abstract

ABSTRACT. Is homogenising nationalism a consequence of industrialisation? This view has been most forcefully and systematically advanced by Ernest Gellner. The article contests this approach by focusing instead on militarism and militarisation. It therefore identifies the key role of the mass army as presaging the era of mass nationalism and cultural homogenisation. Drawing on a range of authors from history, sociology and political science, the relationship is found to be reciprocal and symbiotic. A preliminary exploration on the possibility of early modern (or pre-modern) forms of cultural homogenisation is preceded by a critical assessment of Gellner’s interchangeable use of the terms culture, language and ethnicity.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:ABSTRACT. Is homogenising nationalism a consequence of industrialisation? This view has been most forcefully and systematically advanced by Ernest Gellner. The article contests this approach by focusing instead on militarism and militarisation. It therefore identifies the key role of the mass army as presaging the era of mass nationalism and cultural homogenisation. Drawing on a range of authors from history, sociology and political science, the relationship is found to be reciprocal and symbiotic. A preliminary exploration on the possibility of early modern (or pre-modern) forms of cultural homogenisation is preceded by a critical assessment of Gellner’s interchangeable use of the terms culture, language and ethnicity.
Keywords:Cultural homogenisation
Subjects:L Social studies > L214 Nationalism
L Social studies > L150 Political Economics
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Social & Political Sciences
ID Code:934
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:06 Jul 2007
Last Modified:31 Oct 2014 10:50

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