Egg mass and incubation period allometry in birds and reptiles: effects of phylogeny

Deeming, D. C. and Birchard, G. F. and Crafer, R. and Eady, P. E. (2006) Egg mass and incubation period allometry in birds and reptiles: effects of phylogeny. Journal of Zoology, 270 (2). pp. 209-218. ISSN 0952-8369

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7998.2006.00131.x

Abstract

The factors determining hatchling mass (HM) are investigated in a wide range of birds and reptiles using regression analysis, analysis of covariance and comparative analysis by independent contrasts. In birds, initial egg mass (IEM) at laying is the most important factor affecting HM and phylogenetic relatedness has no significant effects on HM. Developmental maturity of the avian neonates did not affect the proportion of IEM converted into HM. For all reptile species, IEM also significantly affected HM but phylogenetic relatedness did not. By contrast, allometric relationships between IEM and HM in the different orders of reptiles were affected by shell type. The robustness of allometric relationships across taxa in birds and reptiles suggests that there is a physiological link between IEM and HM, which contrasts with that observed for the relationship between egg mass and incubation period. This result has significant implications for the inter-relationships between IEM and embryonic growth, which are discussed for birds and reptiles.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The factors determining hatchling mass (HM) are investigated in a wide range of birds and reptiles using regression analysis, analysis of covariance and comparative analysis by independent contrasts. In birds, initial egg mass (IEM) at laying is the most important factor affecting HM and phylogenetic relatedness has no significant effects on HM. Developmental maturity of the avian neonates did not affect the proportion of IEM converted into HM. For all reptile species, IEM also significantly affected HM but phylogenetic relatedness did not. By contrast, allometric relationships between IEM and HM in the different orders of reptiles were affected by shell type. The robustness of allometric relationships across taxa in birds and reptiles suggests that there is a physiological link between IEM and HM, which contrasts with that observed for the relationship between egg mass and incubation period. This result has significant implications for the inter-relationships between IEM and embryonic growth, which are discussed for birds and reptiles.
Keywords:Birds, Reptiles, Eggs, Initial egg mass, Incubation period, Allometry, Phylogenetic relatedness
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C140 Developmental/Reproductive Biology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:901
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:28 Jun 2007
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:24

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