Implementing a new national role in mental health: the support, time and recovery worker

James, Alison and Chadwick, Siobhan and Rushforth, David (2006) Implementing a new national role in mental health: the support, time and recovery worker. Journal of Mental Health Workforce Development (Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice 1755-6228), 1 (1). pp. 30-36. ISSN 1750-0699, 1755-6228

Documents
uoa12dr01.pdf

Request a copy
[img] PDF
uoa12dr01.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

120kB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Support, time and recovery (STR) workers are in the
vanguard of the new frontline, non-professionally
affiliated groups identified in the NHS Plan
(Department of Health, 2000).
Since 2003, the former changing workforce programme mental health team (now part of NIMHE’s national workforce programme) have facilitated the implementation of this role across England, initially through a pilot project, then an
accelerated development programme (ADP). It is this latter, ongoing, programme that forms the basis of this article. The authors refer to the challenge of establishing the STR worker role in a variety of statutory, non-statutory and independent service settings and achieving the Department of
Health (DH) target of 3000 STR workers in post by
December 2006. The collaborative implementation process is discussed and many issues such as performance management, measures, service user involvement, organisational (including human resources and occupational health) support, and education and training, are explored. Key learning from the process is identified, and consideration
given to the future application of such a simple yet
effective model for change.

Additional Information:Support, time and recovery (STR) workers are in the vanguard of the new frontline, non-professionally affiliated groups identified in the NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000). Since 2003, the former changing workforce programme mental health team (now part of NIMHE’s national workforce programme) have facilitated the implementation of this role across England, initially through a pilot project, then an accelerated development programme (ADP). It is this latter, ongoing, programme that forms the basis of this article. The authors refer to the challenge of establishing the STR worker role in a variety of statutory, non-statutory and independent service settings and achieving the Department of Health (DH) target of 3000 STR workers in post by December 2006. The collaborative implementation process is discussed and many issues such as performance management, measures, service user involvement, organisational (including human resources and occupational health) support, and education and training, are explored. Key learning from the process is identified, and consideration given to the future application of such a simple yet effective model for change.
Keywords:mental health training and education
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B760 Mental Health Nursing
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:865
Deposited On:08 Jun 2007

Repository Staff Only: item control page