Addressing metabolite safety during first-in-man studies using 14C-labeled drug and accelerator mass spectrometry

Lappin, Graham and Seymour, Mark (2010) Addressing metabolite safety during first-in-man studies using 14C-labeled drug and accelerator mass spectrometry. Bioanalysis, 2 (7). pp. 1315-1324. ISSN 1757-6180

Full content URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.10.87

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Active drug metabolites formed in humans but present in relatively low abundance in preclinical species can lead to unpredicted adverse effects during clinical use. The regulatory guidelines in recent years have therefore required that the metabolism of a drug be quantitatively compared between preclinical species and human at the earliest practicable stage of drug development. Amongst the variety of methods available, inclusion of low radioactive doses of 14C drug in first-in-man studies coupled to the sensitive analytical technology of accelerator MS (AMS) has found utility. Measurement of 14C by AMS allows for quantification of metabolites, even if their structures are unknown, and, when used in conjunction with LC-MS, can provide both quantitative and structural data. This review examines a typical approach to using AMS and associated analytical methods in addressing the regulatory guidelines and discusses a number of possible scenarios including the question of steady state. © 2010 Future Science Ltd.

Keywords:carbon 14, carbon, drug, area under the curve, concentration response, dosimetry, drug metabolism, drug safety, half life time, human, in vitro study, intermethod comparison, isotope analysis, isotope labeling, mass spectrometry, metabolite, nonhuman, nuclear magnetic resonance, practice guideline, process development, radioisotope decay, review, sensitivity analysis, animal, chemistry, metabolism, methodology, toxicity testing, Animals, Carbon Radioisotopes, Humans, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Toxicity Tests
Divisions:College of Science > School of Pharmacy
ID Code:8213
Deposited On:21 Mar 2013 17:09

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