From unlawful assembly to aggravated trespass: The control of protest in the 1880s and 1990s’

Stone, Richard (2003) From unlawful assembly to aggravated trespass: The control of protest in the 1880s and 1990s’. In: Behaving badly : social panic and moral outrage - Victorian and modern parallels. Ashgate, Aldershot, pp. 221-235. ISBN 0754609650

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Abstract

Synopsis
Both the Victorian age and the late 20th century are often characterized by contemporaries as times of apparent economic affluence and stability. They are also often characterized as periods which both shared a conviction that the stability of society, including its affluence, was threatened by the activities of social deviants. The essays in this volume seek to examine crime of a socially visible nature, in the context of social panic and moral outrage in both the Victorian period and the late 20th century. Through a series of interconnected case studies, exploring the social and legal responses to such offending, and their public presentation through popular reporting and the court system, a series of apparent continuities as well as discontinuities are highlighted in the making of legislation. The interdisciplinary focus of the book allows it to locate the legal processes and system firmly within the socio-cultural context, instead of examining it as a discrete area of individual study.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:Synopsis Both the Victorian age and the late 20th century are often characterized by contemporaries as times of apparent economic affluence and stability. They are also often characterized as periods which both shared a conviction that the stability of society, including its affluence, was threatened by the activities of social deviants. The essays in this volume seek to examine crime of a socially visible nature, in the context of social panic and moral outrage in both the Victorian period and the late 20th century. Through a series of interconnected case studies, exploring the social and legal responses to such offending, and their public presentation through popular reporting and the court system, a series of apparent continuities as well as discontinuities are highlighted in the making of legislation. The interdisciplinary focus of the book allows it to locate the legal processes and system firmly within the socio-cultural context, instead of examining it as a discrete area of individual study.
Keywords:Law History
Subjects:M Law > M111 English Law
V Historical and Philosophical studies > V144 Modern History 1800-1899
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Law School
ID Code:815
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:18 May 2007
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:13

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