Processes and outputs of an adoption panel: a case study

O'Sullivan, Terence (2005) Processes and outputs of an adoption panel: a case study. Adoption and Fostering Journal, 29 (3). pp. 21-32. ISSN 1740-469x

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Processes and outputs of an adoption panel: a case study
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Abstract

This article examines the processes and outputs of an adoption panel and is the second by Terence O'Sullivan to report on an observational case study. The research investigates how representative and participative panel members were, how attendee presence was structured, what the panel focused on and how conclusions were reached. The panel considered social work proposals in relation to looked after children whose permanence plan was adoption. A scrutiny process was observed that took the form of identifying issues, asking questions, being reassured (or not), coming to a conclusion and giving feedback. The importance of the panel's work stems from its scrutiny of social work proposals and the article suggests various ways in which this could be made more effective.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:This article examines the processes and outputs of an adoption panel and is the second by Terence O'Sullivan to report on an observational case study. The research investigates how representative and participative panel members were, how attendee presence was structured, what the panel focused on and how conclusions were reached. The panel considered social work proposals in relation to looked after children whose permanence plan was adoption. A scrutiny process was observed that took the form of identifying issues, asking questions, being reassured (or not), coming to a conclusion and giving feedback. The importance of the panel's work stems from its scrutiny of social work proposals and the article suggests various ways in which this could be made more effective.
Keywords:Adoption, Fostering, Families, Children, Family welfare
Subjects:L Social studies > L520 Child Care
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Social & Political Sciences
ID Code:787
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:27 Sep 2007
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:23

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