Following the rules: why small groups of tamarins do not reconcile conflicts

Shaffner, Colleen M. and Aureli, Filippo and Caine, Nancy G. (2005) Following the rules: why small groups of tamarins do not reconcile conflicts. Folia Primatologica, 76 (2). pp. 67-76. ISSN 1421-9980

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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000083614

Abstract

Reconciliation is the post-conflict friendly reunion between opponents. A series of conditions and rules in order for reconciliation to take place has been recently proposed. One critical condition is that the relationship between opponents must be disrupted. We tested this condition using post-conflict and matched-control observations on 4 small groups of tamarins (Saguinus labiatus). Our previous lack of evidence for reconciliation was confirmed. No post-conflict relationship damage was therefore expected. We found evidence that relationships were disturbed following conflicts over food but, as in other primates, no evidence for reconciliation following such conflicts was found. For non-food-related conflicts there was no evidence that relationships were disturbed, as opponents were in close proximity to each other and resumed the exact same activity as frequently in the post-conflict observations as they did in the matched-control observations. We conclude that 'everyday' aggression may not disrupt the relationships among individuals from the same family group and therefore reconciliation is not needed

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Reconciliation is the post-conflict friendly reunion between opponents. A series of conditions and rules in order for reconciliation to take place has been recently proposed. One critical condition is that the relationship between opponents must be disrupted. We tested this condition using post-conflict and matched-control observations on 4 small groups of tamarins (Saguinus labiatus). Our previous lack of evidence for reconciliation was confirmed. No post-conflict relationship damage was therefore expected. We found evidence that relationships were disturbed following conflicts over food but, as in other primates, no evidence for reconciliation following such conflicts was found. For non-food-related conflicts there was no evidence that relationships were disturbed, as opponents were in close proximity to each other and resumed the exact same activity as frequently in the post-conflict observations as they did in the matched-control observations. We conclude that 'everyday' aggression may not disrupt the relationships among individuals from the same family group and therefore reconciliation is not needed
Keywords:Social behaviour, Primates, Tamarins, Reconciliation, Post-conflict behaviour, Relationship repair
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C120 Behavioural Biology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:765
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:22 Jun 2007
Last Modified:22 Feb 2010 15:14

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