Behavioral and emotional response of Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata) mothers after their offspring receive an aggression

Schino, Gabriele and Geminiani, Simona and Rosati, Luca and Aureli, Filippo (2004) Behavioral and emotional response of Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata) mothers after their offspring receive an aggression. Journal of comparative psychology, 118 (3). pp. 340-346. ISSN 0735-7036

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0735-7036.118.3.340

Abstract

The authors of this study investigated the behavioral and emotional response of female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) to an aggression received by their offspring to evaluate the existence of cognitive empathic responses in a naturalistic setting. After their offspring received an aggression, mothers did not direct increased affiliative contacts to them. The factors likely to affect the degree of distress in the offspring or the perceived risk for the mother failed to appropriately modulate maternal behavior. Finally, mothers did not increase their frequency of scratching (a behavioral indicator of anxiety) after their offspring had received an aggression. The results suggest Japanese macaque mothers may be unable to understand their offspring's need for distress alleviation after the receipt of aggression.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The authors of this study investigated the behavioral and emotional response of female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) to an aggression received by their offspring to evaluate the existence of cognitive empathic responses in a naturalistic setting. After their offspring received an aggression, mothers did not direct increased affiliative contacts to them. The factors likely to affect the degree of distress in the offspring or the perceived risk for the mother failed to appropriately modulate maternal behavior. Finally, mothers did not increase their frequency of scratching (a behavioral indicator of anxiety) after their offspring had received an aggression. The results suggest Japanese macaque mothers may be unable to understand their offspring's need for distress alleviation after the receipt of aggression.
Keywords:Macaca fuscata yakui, Japanese macaque
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C300 Zoology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:760
Deposited By: Jill Partridge
Deposited On:13 Jul 2007
Last Modified:22 Feb 2010 15:14

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