Recruiting older adults from primary care into a walking intervention in Glasgow

Macdonald, Hazel and MacMillan, Freya and Fitzsimons, Claire and Mutrie, Nanette and Rowe, David and Shaw, Rebecca and Grealy, Madeleine and McConnachie, Alex and Grant, Margaret and Granat, Malcolm and Skelton, Dawn and Evans, Adam and Black, Karen (2010) Recruiting older adults from primary care into a walking intervention in Glasgow. In: Scottish School of Primary Care Annual Conference, 27-28 April 2010, Scotland.

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Recruiting older adults from primary care into a walking intervention in Glasgow.
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Abstract

Background: The relationship between an active lifestyle and good health is well established. Although walking is popular in Scotland, participation declines with increasing age[1]. Walking interventions can increase physical activity (PA) levels of sedentary individuals in Scotland but little is known about the implementation of such interventions into primary care.
Aims: West End Walkers 65+ is examining the feasibility of a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with a PA consultation in Scottish adults aged ≥65 years in a primary care setting.
Method: Individuals from a GP practice in Glasgow were identified and screened by a GP. Study eligibility criteria were; aged ≥65 years, independently living, not meeting the current PA recommendations. Recruitment was via letter. Positive responders were contacted by a researcher to assess PA level and arrange appointments.
Results: From a total list size of 9700 patients, 177 men and 261 women over age 65 were screened by a GP, taking 20-30 minutes/person. 63 men and 103 women were screened out prior to contact. Main reasons for being screened out were severe arthritis(n=34), house bound/general frailty/poor mobility(n=26) and chronic mental health problems(n=24). A further 3 men and 5 women had moved away or were deceased. Study invitation letters were sent to 111 men and 153 women. At present (February 2010), positive responses have been received from 85 individuals, of which 27 were already regularly active. 16 individuals have been randomised into an immediate intervention and 15 into a waiting list control group. 5 participants withdrew after randomisation (4 were too active and 1 was going abroad). Of 82 negative responses, 35 individuals self-assessed as being too active for the study.
Conclusions: Contrary to the Scottish Health Survey results, we found a high percentage of individuals were already regularly active. The Scottish Primary Care Research Network estimated total screening time by the GP to be ~2½ hours (based on screening 200 people/hour). From our findings we would recommend allowing 30 minutes/person for this type of screening.

Additional Information:Background: The relationship between an active lifestyle and good health is well established. Although walking is popular in Scotland, participation declines with increasing age[1]. Walking interventions can increase physical activity (PA) levels of sedentary individuals in Scotland but little is known about the implementation of such interventions into primary care. Aims: West End Walkers 65+ is examining the feasibility of a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with a PA consultation in Scottish adults aged ≥65 years in a primary care setting. Method: Individuals from a GP practice in Glasgow were identified and screened by a GP. Study eligibility criteria were; aged ≥65 years, independently living, not meeting the current PA recommendations. Recruitment was via letter. Positive responders were contacted by a researcher to assess PA level and arrange appointments. Results: From a total list size of 9700 patients, 177 men and 261 women over age 65 were screened by a GP, taking 20-30 minutes/person. 63 men and 103 women were screened out prior to contact. Main reasons for being screened out were severe arthritis(n=34), house bound/general frailty/poor mobility(n=26) and chronic mental health problems(n=24). A further 3 men and 5 women had moved away or were deceased. Study invitation letters were sent to 111 men and 153 women. At present (February 2010), positive responses have been received from 85 individuals, of which 27 were already regularly active. 16 individuals have been randomised into an immediate intervention and 15 into a waiting list control group. 5 participants withdrew after randomisation (4 were too active and 1 was going abroad). Of 82 negative responses, 35 individuals self-assessed as being too active for the study. Conclusions: Contrary to the Scottish Health Survey results, we found a high percentage of individuals were already regularly active. The Scottish Primary Care Research Network estimated total screening time by the GP to be ~2½ hours (based on screening 200 people/hour). From our findings we would recommend allowing 30 minutes/person for this type of screening.
Keywords:Physical activity, Older adults, Primary Care
Subjects:L Social studies > L510 Health & Welfare
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:7551
Deposited On:17 Feb 2013 19:27

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