Constructing disciplinary inquiry communities through Web 2.0

Wood, Jamie and Ryan, Martin (2010) Constructing disciplinary inquiry communities through Web 2.0. In: Critical design and effective tools for E-learning in higher education. Advances in Higher Education and Professional Development (AHEPD) . IGI Global, Hershey, pp. 195-211. ISBN 9781615208791, 9781615208807

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Abstract

This chapter explores the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for supporting independent inquiry-based learning, with a particular focus upon the use of blogs and social bookmarking tools. It begins by outlining the key issues confronting practitioners wishing to engage with such technologies before moving on to describe the approaches that were adopted in a range of first-year History seminar classes in two research-led universities in the UK. The chapter closes with an evaluation of the positive impact of the use of Web 2.0 on student learning and any drawbacks that were encountered. Web 2.0 is judged to have had a positive impact upon student engagement with course materials, encouraging student to conduct independent research outside of class and generating significant interactions between students and their peers as well as with tutors. Future avenues for research include investigations into how the use of such technologies can be scaled up for larger student groups and what impact summative assessment might have upon student engagement.

Additional Information:This chapter explores the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for supporting independent inquiry-based learning, with a particular focus upon the use of blogs and social bookmarking tools. It begins by outlining the key issues confronting practitioners wishing to engage with such technologies before moving on to describe the approaches that were adopted in a range of first-year History seminar classes in two research-led universities in the UK. The chapter closes with an evaluation of the positive impact of the use of Web 2.0 on student learning and any drawbacks that were encountered. Web 2.0 is judged to have had a positive impact upon student engagement with course materials, encouraging student to conduct independent research outside of class and generating significant interactions between students and their peers as well as with tutors. Future avenues for research include investigations into how the use of such technologies can be scaled up for larger student groups and what impact summative assessment might have upon student engagement.
Keywords:Education, Web 2.0, Higher Education, Medieval History
Subjects:V Historical and Philosophical studies > V130 Medieval History
X Education > X342 Academic studies in Higher Education
X Education > X142 Training Teachers - Higher Education
Divisions:College of Arts > School of History & Heritage > School of History & Heritage (History)
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ID Code:7500
Deposited On:11 Feb 2013 13:14

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